Scientific Program : State-of-the-art-Lecture

Désiré Collen, M.D., Ph.D.

Désiré Collen, M.D., Ph.D.
Serendipidity in the Development of Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator

Dr. Collen received his M.D. (1968) and Ph.D. (1974) in Chemistry at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), Belgium.  He completed residencies and research fellowships at University Hospitals K. U. Leuven, New York University Medical Center, and Karolinska Institute.  In 1981, he joined the faculty of Medicine at KUL.  Dr. Collen and members of his laboratory initially developed tPA, currently the most effective drug for thrombolytic therapy of acute myocardial infarction.  Dr. Collen’s research efforts are in the areas of molecular biology and pathophysiology of haemostasis and thrombosis, the development of new thrombolytic and antithrombotic agents, transgenesis and gene targeting for studies of the cardiovascular system, and translational research on cardiovascular drug development.  He has received 4 honorary doctorates (one of which is from the University of Notre Dame) and several scientific awards, including the Francqui Prize (Belgium) and the Robert P. Grant Medal (International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis).  He served as Director of the Center for Molecular and Vascular Biology of the KUL, and the Center for Transgene Technology and Gene Therapy of the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology in Leuven, Belgium, until 2008.  He is also the Founder and Chairman of ThromboGenics NV.

Lindsey Miles, Ph.D.

Lindsey Miles, Ph.D.
Plasminogen Biology: Retrospectives and Prospectives

Dr. Miles received her Ph.D. (1982) in the Department of Biology at the University of California, San Diego, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (1988) in the Department of Immunology at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla.  She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla.  Dr. Miles is a recipient of an American Heart Association Special Recognition Award in Thrombosis (2004) and was elected to Chair the Gordon Research Conference on Plasminogen Activation and Extracellular Proteolysis for 2016.  Dr. Miles research focuses on the interaction between the plasminogen activation system and cell surfaces and downstream effects on cell function and crosstalk between this proteolytic system and cells.  She is currently elucidating the role of a newly discovered plasminogen receptor, Plg-RKT, in inflammation and cancer progression.

 

Martina Sanderson-Smith, Ph.D.

Martina Sanderson-Smith, Ph.D.
Understanding the Nexus Between Microbes and Plasminogen in Invasive Pathogenesis

Dr. Sanderson-Smith received her Ph.D. (2006) in Molecular and Microbiology at the University of Wollongong, Australia and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (2007) at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong.  She was also an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.  Dr. Sanderson-Smith’s research interests are determining host-pathogen interactions, understanding resistance of pathogen to host immunity, determining the role of the plasminogen activation system in infectious diseases, and the identification of targets for therapeutic intervention during infection.

 

Denis Vivien, Ph.D.

Denis Vivien, Ph.D.
The “Ying-Yang” of Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator in the Central Nervous System

Dr. Vivien received his Ph.D. (1992) in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the Paris XI, Orsay University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (1994) at the Sloan Kettering Howard Hughes Institute in Cancer research/molecular biology.  He is currently a Professor in Neuroscience at the Université de Caen Basse-Normandie and Director, INSERM UMR_S U919 “serine proteases and pathophysiology of the neurovascular unit”.  Dr. Vivien’s research interests include investigating the role of serine proteases in regulating ischemic stroke and spinal cord injuries.  His initial work involved studies of the effects of serine proteases on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and downstream effects on neurotoxicity.  These studies have now been extended into determining how these proteases control homeostasis of the neurovascular unit.